Download Black Power in Bermuda: The Struggle for Decolonization by Quito Swan (auth.) PDF

By Quito Swan (auth.)

ISBN-10: 0230102182

ISBN-13: 9780230102187

ISBN-10: 0230109586

ISBN-13: 9780230109582

This booklet examines the impression of Black strength at the British colony of Bermuda, the place the 1972-73 assassinations of its British Police Commissioner and Governor mirrored the Movement's denouncement of British imperialism and the island's racist and oligarchic society.

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Black Power in Bermuda: The Struggle for Decolonization

This publication examines the influence of Black strength at the British colony of Bermuda, the place the 1972-73 assassinations of its British Police Commissioner and Governor mirrored the Movement's denouncement of British imperialism and the island's racist and oligarchic society.

Extra info for Black Power in Bermuda: The Struggle for Decolonization

Sample text

In 1965, Bermuda experienced its first major uprising of the decade, known as the BELCO riots. This so-called riot possessed serious racial undertones. On January 19, 1965, over eighty workers went on strike to protest BELCO’s refusal to allow the BIU to represent its workers. 48 The Police Force eventually attacked the strikers on the grounds that the latter were obstructing employees from attending work. According to some, it was the Police who rioted. The riot squad fired tear gas on the crowd, who armed themselves.

In fact, a 1953 Select Committee on Racial Relations found segregation to be an economic and social necessity. ”19 However, in 1959, a major Theatre Boycott of the Island Theatre (a wide Bermuda chain of theatres) forced the desegregation of Bermuda’s hotels and restaurants. Central to the island’s social activities, the theatre was a microcosm of Bermudian society. Seating was assigned along racial lines. 20 An anonymous group of young Blacks, the “Progressive Group,” organized the Boycott. 21 Blacks emphatically responded to this call.

For example, the three largest parishes (Pembroke, Sandy’s, and Devonshire) contained 23,672 persons out of 42,640 and sent 18 members to Parliament, while the other 6 parishes contained 18,868 persons and sent 24 members to Parliament. Furthermore, in 1960, Pembroke contained 33 percent of Bermuda’s population. As the most densely populated working-class and Black parish, Pembroke contained constituencies that averaged 3,534 inhabitants. Meanwhile, the predominantly wealthy and White parish of Smith contained two constituencies of 1,151 inhabitants each yet had the same voting power as Pembroke.

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Black Power in Bermuda: The Struggle for Decolonization by Quito Swan (auth.)


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